KSF… My favourite!


So what’s a KSF? It’s my name for one of my favourite, most economical dishes… ‘Kitchen Scrap Ferment’.

It’s just chopped vegetable leftovers after a couple of meals fermented in a salt solution, but ‘KSF’ sounds pretty cool.

So… How do I make it?…

Wash, then chop your veggie and put them in a jar
Wash, then chop your veggie and put them in a jar
Add salty water and stir around to release trapped bubbles
Add salty water and stir around to release trapped bubbles of air. The air contains oxygen which is no good to us for this dish.
I like to seal the veggies underwater with a slice of citrus
I like to seal the veggies underwater with a slice of citrus. Keeping the veggies underwater and away from air is important. The citrus adds acidity and a nice tang.
Cover well with a lid or plastic wrap (recycled of course)!
Cover well with a lid or plastic wrap (recycled of course)! This stops extra air, bugs and dust from getting in.

It’s an ‘anaerobic’ (without oxygen) process using anaerobic bacteria. That means that the bacteria don’t like oxygen. The salt in the water stops the wrong bacteria from thriving. The acidity from the citrus helps too.

I used to often get mold on the top of many of my ferments because I didn’t make sure the veggies were underwater and they got exposed to the small amount of air trapped under the lid.

Thinking on it, I mused ‘I need a good way to keep the veggies under the water level, an air seal and acidity’ (that helps both the fermentation and the taste). One day I was inspired to use a thick slice of excess grapefruit and have done that ever since with whatever citrus is handy).

I used to a use 5% salt solution (that’s 50g of salt to a litre of water) but have found that as long as the water tastes distinctly salty, that’s enough. Some folks go as high as 10% (100g / litre).

Once the jar is well sealed, it gets left for about 4 days at this time of year (warm Winter). Then I start to taste it. If it’s just awesome, it goes into the fridge to slow it from fermenting any further and I can eat it at my leisure (nobody else in the family likes home made ferments, so it’s all mine).

If it’s not tangy enough, the jar stays out for a couple more days. It’s really a personal thing and varies from batch to batch because the ingredients are always different.

I like surprises!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s